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Pink Roses Pastel Painting

My flower garden is in full bloom with rose and Lillies of all sorts! It smells so wonderful and all the colors are a treat for the eyes! So here is my first floral painting of the year, called Pink Roses Pastel Painting.

Last week I picked some of my pink roses and brought them inside to enjoy, because they were suffering in the heat. It was really hot outside, in fact unusually hot for our area. We have been having some extreme hot temperatures for the last few weeks, so I have stayed inside! I’m not a fan of extremes in temperature, especially heat. It was the perfect time to do some still life paintings and pink roses made a great subject! So I thought.


Pink Roses Pastel Painting

It’s been awhile since I have painted floral genre and I’m out of practice. Needless to say this pink roses pastel painting was a challenge for me. As I look at the photo of the painting, I see lots of areas that could be improved, but I’m going to leave it as is and call it a learning piece.

I used wine Pastelmat paper that was 9″x12″ in size and soft pastels. After blocking in my sketch I set out to paint and after a few hours I was really unhappy with the way things were going. I took the paper off the easel and threw it in the trash. After taking a break, I came back in the studio and took the painting out of the trash and taped it back on the easel. I decided to use a brush and water to paint out what I had done, and create and under painting. Taking out my frustrations on the painting with water was great fun. I left it to dry and called it a day.

The next morning I turned on the easel light and was surprised to see that the painting could be salvaged and I could see a path forward. So, again, I played with textures and edges and ended up enjoying the process. I worked on staying loose and not blending the pastel.

Roses have always been hard for me to depict in a painting so now the challenge is on! I’ve got to figure this out! Pink is also a difficult color to portray especially in pastel, so maybe I’ll try some of my other roses that have red and orange in them. For now, I’m taking a break from roses and will sneak up on them another day.


Currently on my still life table is a white Lilly from the flower garden. I’m painting it in pastel and it’s coming along okay. The flower smells wonderful!

White Lilly

I’ve painted these Lillies in oils mostly, and created one pastel last year that came out great. I’m haunted by these beautiful flowers and every year I have to paint them. They only last a few weeks, so now is the time to capture their beauty, if at all possible.

I’ll be back soon to show you how the painting turned out. I hope I don’t wreck it! I am struggling with what color to make the background. White isn’t going to work, so I’ll have to invent something. I was thinking I’d make a high key painting by placing the flower on a white background, but now I wonder if that was a good decision. I’ll need to play around and see what happens.

Much love ~ Rhonda

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New Work ~ “Bearded Iris Backside”

New Work ~

This new work entitled “Bearded Iris Backside” describes the back of the Iris where two buds were growing out of the stem. Why did I paint the back of the Iris? Well, viewing a flower from all sides is one of my favorite things to do before deciding on a view to paint. There are so many interesting parts to a flower and most times, the back is just as interesting as the front. Hidden behind this flower were two buds that I never saw until I turned the Iris around, upon cutting it in the garden.

The Bearded Iris had grown crooked in my flower garden and wouldn’t stand straight in the vase. So, upon turning the Iris all different directions, I discovered the buds made a more interesting story and I let the Iris be the backdrop to the buds.

Iris in a vase

The Studio Set up ~

Originally, when I placed the Bearded Iris into my vase, I didn’t add any leaves. The vase is too small to hold the thick stalks of the plant. Further into the painting I decided the composition needed the addition of leaves. You can see how there isn’t a good balance of the elements.

Iris painting in progress

Here is the point when the decision was made to add a single leaf from the Iris patch, which would add flow and balance to the composition. As the last bud was wilting I added a few leaves for reference. The blue tint to the vase is from the addition of water soluble fertilizer. I have discovered flowers last longer with this addition, and that adding an aspirin or some sugar to make flowers last longer is an urban myth.

Iris leaf added to painting

Finished Painting

The painting was done alla prima on an 8”x10” oil primed linen panel, using a tetrad color palette. Because the buds opened so quickly photo references were used to complete the piece. (The original flower set up wilted before the painting was finished.) Here is the finished painting:

Iris Backside oil painting
“Iris Backside”

This new work, “Bearded Iris Backside” oil painting, will be varnished and framed when it’s dry. Afterwards, the painting will be posted in the gallery under Floral Paintings. I’m super pleased with the results and had a wonderful time painting it.

Please note: the Tamarack Mountain Studio watermark is not on the original painting. The watermark is for online purposes only.

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New Work: Tulips and Daffodils Oil Painting

Tulips and Daffodils Oil Painting

Recently, I finished a new oil painting of the Tulips and Daffodils blooming in the flower garden. I wasn’t totally idle while awaiting creativity to come back for eight months, a.k.a. The Muse, and worked on a stained glass project , which you can read about HERE. But now The Muse is back and things are good.

The Tulips and Daffodils put on a spectacular show this year. Due to the abundance of rain this spring, the flowers grew big and lasted a long time.

A beautiful bouquet adorned my studio for a few short days as my subject for this painting. Reference photos were used to finish the painting when the flowers had wilted. Some of the photos came out beautiful and I may use them in other photography projects.

“Pink Tulip” Copyright Tamarack Mountain Studio
“Orange Tulip”
Daffodil

Look how lovely the tulips are. They bloomed in an array of colors from pastel pink to vibrant orange with splashes of red! Here’s the finished painting entitled “Daffodils and Tulips”, painted on an 8″x 10″ panel in oils. It will be framed in white and you can find it in the Gallery in a few months.

“Daffodils and Tulips”

The “Tamarack Mountain Studio” watermark is not on the original painting. The new “Tulips and Daffodils” oil painting is drying in the studio and next month will be varnished, before sending it off to be framed. I really enjoyed painting this piece and had the most fun painting the vase and the leaves on the table.

Currently on the easel is a Beared Iris painting and it’s coming out great! I can’t wait to share it with you! Here’s a sneak peak:

Thanks for stopping by! I’ll post the latest painting soon, so stay tuned!

Happy Summer! Much Love ~Rhonda

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Introductory Pricing Ends August 31, 2019

Introductory Pricing Ends Soon


Introductory Pricing on all oil paintings will end on August 31, 2019.  If you would like to purchase a painting at the introductory pricing rates, you still have a few weeks left! After the price change, the only way to purchase at a discount will be if you are a Tamarack Mountain Studio member. You can become a member by clicking HERE.  Being a member of Tamarack Mountain Studio grants you insider purchasing power during secret sales and allows you to be entered in the yearend giveaway of one of my miniature paintings.

Creating an oil painting takes many steps and a lot of editing before it is ready for the market. Each layer must be fully dry before a new layer is added, otherwise cracking of the painting can occur. Once a painting is finished, it takes several months to dry before the varnish is added. After the varnish is fully dry, a painting is framed unless it has been painted on a gallery wrapped box canvas. Gallery wrapped box canvas paintings are meant to be displayed without a frame. You can see why the purchase of an oil painting is an investment.

You can shop for my original oil paintings by clicking the Paintings tab in the header. I look forward to having you as one of my many collectors!

~Rhonda

 

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Plein Air oil painting of a White Lily Flower.

My Plein Air oil painting of a White Lily Flower is just about completed. I began this painting a few weeks ago when I decided to paint one of my Lily flowers in Plein air. You can read about the painting experience here. Despite the weather issues I had to endure,  I’m very happy with the final outcome of the White Lily Flower oil painting! The painting size is 6″x6″ and was painted on a gesso panel. It may be small in size but the composition and the vibrant colors make an exciting statement.

 

White Lily oil painting
“White Lily” 6″x6″ oil painting on panel

 

The painting looks better in person because it is hard to capture light colors with a camera. The yellow hues of the petals are a vibrant lemon color and the cool greens pop against the yellow hues. The orange highlights on the anthers define their volume while the muted purple of the flower’s stigma portrays its shiny surface. Dark jewel tones of Viridian, Cerulean blue and a bit of Burnt Sienna were used in the background, in order to showcase the Lily. One can almost imagine the intoxicating lovely smell of this beautiful flower.

 

Thank you for stopping by. Until next time, much love! ~ Rhonda