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New Work ~ “Bearded Iris Backside”

New Work ~

This new work entitled “Bearded Iris Backside” describes the back of the Iris where two buds were growing out of the stem. Why did I paint the back of the Iris? Well, viewing a flower from all sides is one of my favorite things to do before deciding on a view to paint. There are so many interesting parts to a flower and most times, the back is just as interesting as the front. Hidden behind this flower were two buds that I never saw until I turned the Iris around, upon cutting it in the garden.

The Bearded Iris had grown crooked in my flower garden and wouldn’t stand straight in the vase. So, upon turning the Iris all different directions, I discovered the buds made a more interesting story and I let the Iris be the backdrop to the buds.

Iris in a vase

The Studio Set up ~

Originally, when I placed the Bearded Iris into my vase, I didn’t add any leaves. The vase is too small to hold the thick stalks of the plant. Further into the painting I decided the composition needed the addition of leaves. You can see how there isn’t a good balance of the elements.

Iris painting in progress

Here is the point when the decision was made to add a single leaf from the Iris patch, which would add flow and balance to the composition. As the last bud was wilting I added a few leaves for reference. The blue tint to the vase is from the addition of water soluble fertilizer. I have discovered flowers last longer with this addition, and that adding an aspirin or some sugar to make flowers last longer is an urban myth.

Iris leaf added to painting

Finished Painting

The painting was done alla prima on an 8”x10” oil primed linen panel, using a tetrad color palette. Because the buds opened so quickly photo references were used to complete the piece. (The original flower set up wilted before the painting was finished.) Here is the finished painting:

Iris Backside oil painting
“Iris Backside”

This new work, “Bearded Iris Backside” oil painting, will be varnished and framed when it’s dry. Afterwards, the painting will be posted in the gallery under Floral Paintings. I’m super pleased with the results and had a wonderful time painting it.

Please note: the Tamarack Mountain Studio watermark is not on the original painting. The watermark is for online purposes only.

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New Work: Tulips and Daffodils Oil Painting

Tulips and Daffodils Oil Painting

Recently, I finished a new oil painting of the Tulips and Daffodils blooming in the flower garden. I wasn’t totally idle while awaiting creativity to come back for eight months, a.k.a. The Muse, and worked on a stained glass project , which you can read about HERE. But now The Muse is back and things are good.

The Tulips and Daffodils put on a spectacular show this year. Due to the abundance of rain this spring, the flowers grew big and lasted a long time.

A beautiful bouquet adorned my studio for a few short days as my subject for this painting. Reference photos were used to finish the painting when the flowers had wilted. Some of the photos came out beautiful and I may use them in other photography projects.

“Pink Tulip” Copyright Tamarack Mountain Studio
“Orange Tulip”
Daffodil

Look how lovely the tulips are. They bloomed in an array of colors from pastel pink to vibrant orange with splashes of red! Here’s the finished painting entitled “Daffodils and Tulips”, painted on an 8″x 10″ panel in oils. It will be framed in white and you can find it in the Gallery in a few months.

“Daffodils and Tulips”

The “Tamarack Mountain Studio” watermark is not on the original painting. The new “Tulips and Daffodils” oil painting is drying in the studio and next month will be varnished, before sending it off to be framed. I really enjoyed painting this piece and had the most fun painting the vase and the leaves on the table.

Currently on the easel is a Beared Iris painting and it’s coming out great! I can’t wait to share it with you! Here’s a sneak peak:

Thanks for stopping by! I’ll post the latest painting soon, so stay tuned!

Happy Summer! Much Love ~Rhonda

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“Teapot” Original Oil on panel

Teapot

 “Teapot” is a 6″x6″ original oil on panel painting.

I used a limited palette of whites and greys to portray the subject.

The black frame with silver liner, makes a very dramatic statement.

This painting may be small, but I love the way it commands attention!

Signed by the artist. Certificate of Authenticity included.

Please note: The Tamarack Mountain Studio watermark will not be on your painting.

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Fall is my favorite time of the year.

Plein Air painting at Whiskey Rock
Welcome Fall:

Fall is my favorite time of the year.  Each year brings different weather patterns and fall can last well into November. Often times though Fall is over by mid-October. Last weekend we had snow down to the valley floor and a lot of plants shriveled in the below-freezing temps. It was the first time in 93 years we had snowfall in September!

We had to run a heater in our greenhouse to keep our tomato plants safe since we still have quite a bit of green tomatoes. The plants outside the greenhouse had to be covered. We hoped for the best and I’m happy to say that no plants were lost. The temperatures have been slowly rising and we are now out of frost danger. It looks like we won’t have an Indian Summer with fall lasting to November this year because of the mild summer we had and now with early snow.

Foggy Mornings:

During Fall there will often be fog after it rains. I think the landscape is so beautiful when fog is rolling in. I don’t care for driving in the soupy stuff, but watching it float around over the lake and through the forest is awesome. Here’s a little video I captured of the fog building up in the morning. An hour later we were totally engulfed in white.

 

Fall inspired oil paintings:

The Fall colors during foggy conditions seem more vibrant. It may be due to there not being bright sunlight to wash out the hues. I was inspired to paint this scene of our street during one, particularly foggy day. “Fog in the Forest” is an 11″x14″ oil on canvas and is a part of my personal collection:

Fall is my favorite time of the year

 

This next oil painting, “Leaves on the Driveway”, was inspired by the leaves in our driveway during Fall. It was painted entirely with a palette knife on 4″x4″ gallery wrapped box canvas. I bring this painting out every year as part of my favorite fall decor.

 

Decorating with artwork:

The best thing about small works of art is they can be easily moved. Each year the decor is a little different and this year, “Leaves on the Driveway” is being showcased in the entry on a shelf. Sometimes small art pieces are displayed on the dining room table as a centerpiece along with a vase of flowers. Other times fall-themed paintings are showcased on the fireplace mantle, with a garland of autumn leaves.

 

fall decor ideas


Painting Plein Air:

 

Bridge at Buttonhook

The Bridge at Buttonhook is a 6″x6″ oil on panel. This painting was done in Plein Air last year in October. It was still warm enough to go boating so we packed lunch and enjoyed the warm sunshine and peacefulness of the lake.  The very next day, the temps dropped 20 degrees, the wind arrived, clouds rolled in and snow blanketed the mountain tops. Fall was promptly over!

 

I hope to be able to do some more Fall Plein air work this year before its all said and done, like this one:

Plein air painting during Fall, my favorite time of the year.

Plein Air at Whiskey Rock” is painted in oils on a 5″x7″ canvas.  Whiskey Rock is a point on the lake which has several boat docks and a small campground. Whiskey Rock campground is tucked into a small cove, and is a favorite spot for weekend boat camping. I painted this one from our boat and absolutely loved how it turned out, with the backlit trees and the reflections in the water. The day was calm, and warm but the air was filled with smoke that year from all the surrounding wildfires when “Plein Air at Whiskey Rock” was created.

One day, during the framing of “Plein Air at Whiskey Rock”, I accidentally drilled too deep and poked a hole in the painting. Now I have to repaint “Plein Air at Whiskey Rock“. Geesh!

Is Fall your favorite time of the year or are you more of a summer lover? Do you decorate your space with Fall themes during this time of the year? What is your favorite time of the year? Leave a comment below and lets chat!

I’ll share some more of my favorite fall paintings in the next post. Until we meet again, much love! ~Rhonda

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Roasted Tomato Sauce Recipe ~

With Fall around the corner, the garden is winding down. All veggies are in ripen mode and I am harvesting tomatoes like crazy.  I thought I’d share my Roasted Tomato Sauce Recipe if you are looking for something new to do with all those fresh-picked tomatoes you have from your garden! One can only eat so much salad, right?

tomatoes from the garden

You can use fresh tomatoes from your local farmer’s market if you aren’t growing your own. I prefer Roma tomatoes because they have fewer seeds and a little more pulp. But as you can see, I also use regular tomatoes for their juice.

Here are the ingredients for the roasted tomato sauce recipe:
  1. 1 lb. Fresh Tomatoes (or more, depending on how much sauce you want to make)
  2. 1 or 2 large onions (2 if you’re going big)
  3. 1 to 2 heads of garlic  (separate cloves and use all)
  4. 4 to 6 tblsp. of Virgin Olive oil
  5. 1 tsp. Sea Salt or Kosher Salt
  6. 1/2 tsp. Black Pepper
  7. 1 tsp. crushed dry Basil
  8. 1 to 2 tsp. sugar
Here’s what you do:

Slice all tomatoes into halves and place them in a roasting pan with the skin sides up in one layer. Cut the onion into quarters and add to the pan. Next, separate your garlic into cloves and slightly mash, then add to the roasting pan. Drizzle the olive oil over all ingredients then add the salt, pepper, basil, and sugar. (Adjust oil and seasonings accordingly if you are making a bigger batch than mine.)

Now get your hands in there and mix up all the tomatoes, onion, garlic, etc. so that everything is nicely coated in the olive oil and spices. What a mess, but so much fun! Your pan will look like this:

Tomatoes for sauce

Now you are ready to roast the tomatoes:

Pop your pan into a preheated 350-degree oven and roast for 45 minutes or until the skins begin to blacken. Be careful when you open the oven door at the end of roasting because a bit of smoke may come out. Your kitchen will smell like heaven! This is what the roasted tomatoes look like when finished roasting:

 

roasted tomatoes ready to make sauce

 

Allow the pan of tomatoes to cool a bit until able to safely handle. You can then pour all the ingredients into a pot and use an immersion blender to blend everything into a sauce. Or if you don’t have an immersion blender, place the roasted ingredients into a high capacity upright blender to make your sauce. I use my Vitamix because it makes quick work of the blending process, chopping all the tomato seeds, onions, and garlic into a thick sauce.

 

roasted tomato sauce

 

Use the roasted tomato sauce immediately or save for later:

If you are planning on using your sauce immediately, adjust seasonings to taste and if it’s too thick, add a bit of water or your favorite red wine. At this point, you can also add in other spices like oregano, allspice and more basil. Cook the sauce on the stovetop for 20 minutes to incorporate your additions, then pour over your favorite cooked pasta.  For pizza sauce, do not add any other liquid.

You can also pour the sauce into prepared canning jars and can according to your favorite method. Or if you don’t like to can, like me, allow the sauce jars to come to room temperature and then freeze. Just remember to leave enough headroom in the jar, so the jars won’t crack in the freezer. The roasted tomato sauce freezes very well, in fact, I still have jars of frozen sauce from last year’s harvest.

“Canned Tomatoes” oil painting:

Last year, as an homage to my tomato harvest I painted this painting of canned whole tomatoes. The painting hangs in my kitchen.

The “Canned Tomatoes” oil painting was inspired by the hot jars sitting on the counter after I had used a water bath canning method, which I no longer use. I don’t care for the added acidity that citric acid creates when canning. So now I just freeze my jars and all is good!

A few blog posts ago I shared a recipe for tomato salsa. Did you make salsa? If you did, let me know how it turned out in the comments below.

I’m looking forward to Fall and doing some Plein air paintings of the beautiful trees in all their glory. In the meantime, I’ve been working on some previous paintings and trying to wrap things up so I can paint something new!

Until we meet again ~ Much Love

Rhonda

 


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